CybersecurityCybersecurity

Secuna onboards 1,300 registered ethical hackers

Secuna, a community-powered cybersecurity testing platform, has announced that it has on-boarded 1,300 registered ethical hackers, which is poised to be the largest established hacker community in the country.

Secuna was built with the goal of encouraging the national government to use its platform “for free.” Secuna is developing a business model with government agencies that is similar to “Hack the Pentagon” and “Hack the Air Force” cybersecurity programs in the United States, in which ethical hackers identify security holes in an entity’s computer systems.

“Having a large network of ethical hackers is a huge advantage for Secuna in helping companies, organizations, and even the government secure their digital assets,” said AJ Dumanhug, CEO and co-founder, Secuna. “They are not only trained to spot vulnerabilities but are also there to prevent further online crimes. Their understanding of the breakdown of a data breach, where the common vulnerabilities are, and how to potentially resolve these before they become a problem helps reduce a company’s risk of being breached.

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Secuna is a crowdsourced cybersecurity testing platform with a community of the world’s most advanced and highly vetted cybersecurity professionals and ethical hackers. For its services called penetration testing and bug bounty program, Secuna taps the best ethical hackers to identify potential entry points into systems and then breach them to determine the extent of damage they can cause. According to Secuna, it was able to resolve a total of 1,037 vulnerabilities and bugs across its clients in 2021.

“We will continue to uphold our commitment to helping startups, SMEs, and government by connecting them to the most able cybersecurity professionals to simulate cyber-attacks and find security flaws that real-world malicious hackers can exploit and leverage to gain access to IT systems,” said Dumanhug.

Secuna also announced that its bug bounty program awarded a total of $22,245 as a reward for finding and reporting valid bug reports of less than five companies in the year 2021.